4 Bridges that show the beauty of being eco-friendly.

Solar Powered Kurilpa Bridge, Brisbane
Technological advancements have led to the rise of several innovative structures over the past few years. These structures aim to reduce the carbon footprint while not hindering their style and functionality in any way. Take a look at these really innovative brides for example. Considered as architectural marvels, these structures stand testament to the fact that it is in fact, possible to achieve style and innovation without degrading the environment in the process.


Solar Powered Kurilpa Bridge, Brisbane

Solar Powered Kurilpa Bridge, Brisbane

Deemed to be the longest footbridge in the world, the Kurilpa Bridge has an impressive span of 470 meters. But what’s more impressive about the bridge is its efficient, eco-friendly lighting system featuring an array of LED lights. The lights get their power from over 84 solar panels which are connected to a central grid. This also enables the bridge to use whatever power it needs and give back any surplus power back to the grid.

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia
This six foot wide eco-friendly bridge rises nearly 2000 feet above the sea level and is located atop the Mount Mat Cincang. The bridge deck follows a curved architectural design which enables visitors to enjoy stupendous views of the forest canopy as well as the region’s varied wildlife. A series of triangular viewing decks also allow visitors to catch glimpses of the picturesque Langkawi.



Copenhagen Harbor LM Project

Copenhagen Harbor LM Project

This massive solar bridge makes use of several sustainable technologies to produce and store power. These include radiant floor heating, heating/cooling systems, skyscrapers with photovoltaic sheathing and even a wind turbine skybridge.


Telok Blangah Bridge, Singapore

Telok Blangah Bridge, Singapore
The Telok Blangah Bridge is a perfect example of how one can get as close to nature and wildlife without actually disturbing them in any way. The majority of parks in the world are created by chopping down trees and clearing out forest areas. However, Telok Blangah follows a unique layout in that the bridge has been constructed high above the forest canopy.
This would allow visitors walking on the bridge to enjoy unparalleled wildlife views without disturbing the natural environment. The bridge follows a web like pattern which consist of open structures at regular intervals to allow plenty of natural air and light to pass through. Don’t miss out connection points like Henderson Waves which is the highest pedestrian bridge in Singapore, as well as Alexandra Arch which hosts a dazzling multicolored LED lightshow every night.
Advancements in technology have helped in the rise of several large scale eco-friendly structures around the world. The bridges mentioned in this list are some of the more perfect examples of how a structure can be eco-friendly and sustainable while servings its basic purpose seamlessly.

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